Random Thoughts

Thai Chili Hopper by Todd Henson

Grasshopper resting on a Thai chili pepper

I wonder if this grasshopper has acquired a taste for Thai chili peppers? My brother mentioned several of the peppers he’s picked have had their tips eaten by something. Then I found this grasshopper conveniently perched atop a ripening pepper. Could this be the culprit? Do we have a Thai Chili Hopper in the garden?

I was worried the grasshopper would spring if I spent too much time around it so I opted to handhold my camera, letting me move in and out with less effort. This does mean the photos are likely not as sharp as they could have been if I’d spent more time on them. To get in close enough I attached extension tubes to the 70-300mm lens. This made creating sharp photos even more difficult, but I was just out having fun with these images, so I'm pleased with the results.

Some like it hot!

Top down view on our Thai Chili Hopper

Is this the guilty party that's been nibbling on the chili peppers?


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Gear Mentioned in this Post


Don't Forget to Look UP When Photographing Birds by Todd Henson

Great Blue Heron flying away from the scene of the crime.

WARNING: This topic, though light-hearted, may not appeal to all viewers. But it does teach an important lesson if you photograph birds in the wild.

I love photographing birds, especially when I’m able to document birds in flight. But there is at least one potential downside to this activity, something that could ruin your day if you’re not careful to avoid it.

A Great Blue Heron. Such a beautiful bird. And yet... see the photo further below.

What am I talking about? Why is the title of this post, “Don’t Forget to Look UP When Photographing Birds?” Well, birds often defecate while in flight, or just before taking flight. And it’s not fun to be on the receiving end of this.

I feel sorry for any poor paddler in the river below this Great Blue Heron! Click on the image for a larger view. Go ahead, I dare you!

Thankfully, I’ve never been on the receiving end of a Great Blue Heron or Bald Eagle. As you can see in these photographs they can make quite a mess. But I have been hit by a Canada Goose flying overhead. It was so low I almost felt the air from its wings. Geese mostly eat plant matter so what I was hit with was fairly solid and didn’t make much of a mess. But birds that eat fish, animals or insects aren’t as easy to clean up from. I have been hit by a smaller song bird. Not fun.

So what’s my advice?

Don't stand too close when looking up at Bald Eagles! Not sure what you're seeing? Click on the image to see a larger version.

  • Always be aware of your surroundings. Try to determine the birds typical flight path, or places they commonly perch. You can’t plan everything, there’s always a chance one will fly over you, but being aware of where they may fly or perch at least gives you a chance of avoiding any bad encounters. If you see one heading your way just be aware of what might happen and be ready to move. The odds should be fairly low, but it does happen.
  • Learn the behavior of the birds you’re observing. Many birds, such as Bald Eagles and Osprey, will often defecate before taking flight. So be careful if you are observing a perched bird from down below, especially if it begins to left its tail feathers. They have more range than you might think!
  • Always wear a hat! Your clothes may still be a mess but at least it will help protect your head. When the goose let loose it hit my hat and backpack and mostly bounced off. No real harm done. When I was hit by the song bird I wasn’t wearing a hat. I had to clean off my hair, the side of my face, and my sunglasses. And all this in the middle of a busy city. Not my best day, but hey, “it” happens!
  • Always carry a towel or cloth of some kind with you, just in case you might need it. It’s not fun cleaning up this kind of mess without a cloth, trust me!
  • Bring some of that portable hand wash with you. Wiping it off is one thing, but getting yourself clean is nice, too.

Well, that’s it for today. I apologize for the somewhat unappealing topic, but it does happen and it’s best to plan ahead in case it ever happens to you. And worst case, if it does happen, you’ll have quite the story you never want to tell your friends about! 😀

Have fun out there. Enjoy photographing nature. And always remember: Look UP when photographing birds!!!

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Just Below The Surface by Todd Henson

Just Below the Surface

Just below the surface of a small lake a young turtle follows her mother towards a pair of koi. The koi appear to pay as little attention to the turtles as do the turtles to the koi. Each group swims in their own world, though one they share.

The young turtle’s only thoughts are of its mother. When the mother stops moving forward the small turtle moves around to face its mother, nose to nose, moving both front legs forward as if to hug its mother.

The koi continue slowly gliding through the water, their bodies creating beautiful curves. They very likely are waiting for food from those of us above.

Two different worlds, above and below, and yet all still part of the same. These are my thoughts as I watch these wonderful creatures just below the surface.